Published February 10th in SEO by James Parsons

2017 was a year of webmasters finally making the migration from an insecure HTTP site to a secure HTTPS site. A primary impetus was Google’s continued push for security, along with all of the massive large-scale hackings that took place throughout the year. Of course, SSL has been a search ranking factor since 2014, albeit a minor one.
It was also a year of website owners seeing ranking drops or no change at all, deciding that the issues they had with SSL weren’t worth it, and reverting the changes. In my mind that’s a mistake – and in fact, some of my sites saw a ranking boost switching to SSL – but I get that every site is different.
Reasons You Might Want to Revert
There are a lot of different reasons why you might want to revert the change from HTTP to HTTPS. Let’s talk about them for a moment. I bet at least a few of you are jumping the gun, or at least making a hasty decision.
#1: My rankings dropped! This is certainly a concern, particularly when the entire reason you’re making the change in the first place is that Google says it’s a ranking factor. Thus, your rankings should increase, right?

Well, experienced SEOs know that there’s…

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