Published August 18th in SEO by John Boitnott

Two elements of web usage are often the source of controversy. Bounce rate and click through rate are both simple to understand, with some complexity that some people don’t realize exists. The real question, though, is do they have an effect on your SEO? Let’s examine them both.
Bounce Rates and SEO
First, I want to talk about bounce rate, because bounce rate is the trickier of the two to grasp fully.
At first blush, it seems easy to understand. A user performs a search and gets search results. They click a result. They quickly click away from the result. That site records a bounce visitor. It’s not great to have, right? The user is indicating that they didn’t really want to be on the site, so they left.
There’s more depth to it. For example, what happens if the user clicks to the site and then closes their browser? There’s no second point of reference, so it counts as a bounce. Now what happens if the user simply leaves the browser window open? There’s still no second click, no second reference trigger, so it counts as a bounce. That user might have a guide open for an hour, referencing it step by step, but because they didn’t click a second ti…

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