Published August 24th in SEO by Dan Virgillito

Amp pages are a type of page created using rules from the AMP system. AMP stands for the Accelerated Mobile Pages project, which is spearheaded by Google and a coalition of other entities attempting to make the web a better place for mobile users of all sorts.
The Fundamental Issue
AMP is a solution to a problem, and to understand its value, you need to understand the problem. Thankfully, it’s a very easy problem to grasp.
When you browse the web using a mobile device, like a smartphone, a tablet, a Kindle, or whatever new technology comes out later, you’re doing it on a small, underpowered device. Sure, smartphones today are more powerful than computers from two decades ago, but the internet is also a very different place. Computers from 20 years ago couldn’t render huge images, play music, stream video, or play Flash content any more than underpowered cell phones can today.
In the early days of the internet, a webpage might have half a dozen HTML tags and some plaintext content, probably a few hyperlinks, and not a lot else. The average website was a mere 14.1 kilobytes, which isn’t even enough for a website favicon these days. Compare that to today, where the a…

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