Published today in SEO by Eric Sornoso

For some, it may seem like a question out of the stone ages; does your business need a mobile version of your site to succeed?  For others, the question is simply a valid one.  They haven’t needed one so far, and they’re doing perfectly fine.  The question is, would they be doing better if they got one?  Let’s take a look at the issues involved.
What Google Prefers
The driving factor behind most SEO decisions, sooner or later, comes back to Google.  The megacorp is one evil CEO away from being Lexcorp, all things considered, with the power they wield over the Internet.  Therefore, it’s a good idea to get to know what Google wants out of a website, and do your best to match your site to those desires.
Google has realized that mobile users are going to overtake desktop users on the Internet.  In some instances, they already have, such as on Facebook.  With such a significant portion of the Internet using mobile devices, it’s no wonder they want to cater to them.
Google, undoubtedly, prefers that your site have a mobile version.  They have a number of preferences regarding what you do with that mobile version…

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